Vision a senior sight journal

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Pseudophakic CME typically happens two to twelve weeks following cataract surgery, although in rare cases it may present months afterwards. The peak incidence of visually important CME is four to six weeks after cataract surgery. Two patient populations at particular high risk for developing postoperative CME are those with a history of uveitis or uncontrolled diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. Postoperative rates of CME in patients with uveitis, even when controlled preoperatively, can be larger than thirty-five percent. CME in patients with diabetes, especially those with preexisting DR and DME, has been reported to be as high as fifty-five percent. Once you have established a diagnosis of pseudophakic CME, appropriate management hinges on identifying an underlying cause, if any. Pseudophakic CME is a main cause of decreased visual acuity following uncomplicated cataract surgery and can be the source of significant patient morbidity. By identifying risk factors for the development of CME, the surgeon can modify surgical techniques or regimens to mitigate postoperative inflammation and decrease the risk if postoperative CME. Visit one of our 8 locations including Fort MyersNaples, and Cape Coral.






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Vision Treatments & Technology

This journal will include information in the optometry and ophthamology fields including studies and other valuable eye care stories.

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